4 - 5 February 2017 Tumbalong Park, Darling Harbour
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Welcome to the largest Serbian Festival in the Southern Hemisphere | 4 – 5 Feb 2017 | Tumbalong Park, Darling Harbour.

The Serbian Festival is brought to you by the Serbian Orthodox Church and the Serbian Orthodox Youth Association Inc.

Discover the heart of Serbia and join us at the Serbian Festival in Sydney. Infuse yourself with the cultural traditions of this European country and enjoy a weekend of exciting performances, fun activities for the family, music, delicious food, competitions and much more!

Click below to check out the previous websites for the Serbian Festival of Sydney!

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Food

Indulge yourself in a range of exotic foods that will have your taste buds tingling at the festival. Enjoy some of Serbia’s most delicious foods on the day and experience a small portion of Serbia’s finest cuisine. Below are some of the favourite delicacies that will be available for purchase at the Serbian Festival in Sydney.

Chevapi / Chevapchichi (Minced Sausages)

Chevapi / Chevapchichi (Minced Sausages)

This little tongue twister is one the first words a foreigner learns upon arriving to Serbia! Ćevapčići are meat fingers made of minced pork and veal, infused with spices and grilled on charcoal.

Pljeskavica (Meat Patty)

Pljeskavica (Meat Patty)

Traditional pljeskavica is made from mixture of ground meats. Typically two or more out of lamb, pork, beef or veal grilled with onions and served hot on plate with side dishes (in Belgrade), as a hamburger or on fresh kajmak with a thick pita (lepinja) bread.

Burek (Pastry)

Burek (Pastry)

Burek is made from layers of dough, alternating with layers of other fillings in a circular baking pan and then topped with a last layer of dough. Traditionally it may be baked with no filling (prazan), with stewed minced meat and onions, or with cheese. Modern bakeries offer cheese and spinach, apple, sour cherries, potato, mushroom, and pizza-burek as well.

Pita (Pastry)

Pita (Pastry)

“Pita” is a word assumed in the Serbian language form the Greek, which in turn assumed it from the Persian. Pita in Serbian means pie and depending on the method that pita is made and it’s fillings define it further. The type of pita shown here is created by rolled dough and can contain a variety of fillings such as cheese, meat, spinach, apple, or walnut to name a few.

Krofne (Doughnuts)

Krofne (Doughnuts)

Serbian doughnuts or krofne are eaten year-round but especially before the Great Lent begins. Orthodox Christians observe Cheesefare Sunday (the last day dairy products can be eaten) the day before Clean Monday, so krofne, palacinke and other fried and rich foods would be eaten then. Krofne are doughnuts filled with custard, chocolate, cream, jelly or no filling at all. The Belgrade intelligentsia or old established Belgrade families were known for making krofne at midnight for traditional Serbian New Year’s Eve celebrations.

Palachinke (Crepes)

Palačinke (Crepes)

These delicate crepes are simple to prepare and can be made either sweet or savoury.

Beverages

Refresh yourself with a range of beverages at the festival. Whether you’re a wine lover or you enjoy a nice cold beer the Serbian Festival in Sydney will quench your thirst. Experience a small portion of Serbia’s favourite alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages on the day. Below are some of the drinks that will be available for purchase at the Serbian Festival in Sydney.

Pivo (Beer)

Pivo (Beer)

Several Serbian beers are imported in Australia “Jelen” (The Stag), and “Lav” (The Lion) being the most readily available.

Vino (Wine)

Vino (Wine)

Serbia is placed comfortably within the wine belt – between 41 and 47 degrees northern latitude. With sunny summers and mild springs, it boasts wine making tradition dating back to Roman times. Serbia is home to several autochtonous grape varieties: vranac and prokupac are the best known reds special to this region, while the best known homegrown whites are tamjanika and smederevka.

Knjaz Miloš (Mineral and Natural Water)

Knjaz Miloš (Mineral and Natural Water)

Serbia is blessed with abundance of both freshwater and mineral water springs. Some have been used since Roman times, for drinking or as spas. The beneficial quality of mineral water which we bring to you today, was known even at the time of the first ruler of the 19th century independent Serbia, Knjaz Miloš Obrenović.

Culture

Experience a small part of the diverse Serbian culture through traditional music and dance.

Serbian Folkloric Dancing

Serbian Folkloric Dancing

Serbian dance is an old tradition and a strong element in the Serbian culture. The traditional dances are of social function, bringing the community and families together at various important days such as weddings, Christmas or Easter.

The dances can be part of performance art (theatre, i.e. part of historical events) and social life.

Serbian Music

Serbian Music

Today the Serbian folk music is both rural (izvorna muzika) and urban (starogradska muzika) and includes a two-beat dance called kolo, which is a circle dance with almost no movement above the waist, accompanied by instrumental music made most often with an accordion, but also with other instruments: frula (traditional kind of a recorder), tamburica, or accordion. The Kolos usually last for about 5–13 minutes.